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Improved Access to Naloxone in Ontario’s Fight against Opioid Overdoses:

August 11, 2017

LEGAL + AVAILABLE ≠ ACCESSIBLE

Naloxone

Over the past decade Ontario has seen a steady rise in the number of opioid related deaths and narcotic misuse across all socioeconomic groups in the province. Of particular concern is that despite ongoing provincial initiatives little has been accomplished to prevent the rampant abuse and misuse of narcotic pain medications. The opioid epidemic is a public health crisis of epic proportions. Recently it has been estimated that 1 in 8 deaths in Ontario is related to opioid abuse.

The government has rolled out a variety of initiatives to combat the problem. They have stopped paying for higher-strength narcotic pain medications through the provincial drug benefit payment plan in an effort to reduce the abuse of these agents. The provincial government has also increased funding for addiction services, and set out new guidelines for opioid use in chronic pain. (http://nationalpaincentre.mcmaster.ca/guidelines.html)

These recent policy initiatives from the provincial government to combat the provinces growing opioid crisis are welcome news. The problem represents a complex health issue with potentially devastating consequences for individuals, families and the communities they live in. Unfortunately the crisis continues to grow and these efforts do not go far enough to help prevent the senseless deaths that are occurring every day on the streets of our cities from accidental overdoses.

blog graph.jpg

Ontario opioid toxicity deaths, by drug – 2002-13. Data from Ontario Coroner.

Historically the use of the lifesaving antidote for an opioid overdose, Naloxone was only available to a select group of healthcare providers like physicians and paramedics. Most recently this past year the provincial government reduced the restrictions on this lifesaving medication making it available in local pharmacies to consumers without requiring a prescription.

This is a welcome policy change that will save lives….unless you live in Grassy Narrows, Attawapiskat, Pikangikum, White Dog, or any of the other remote Northern Ontario First Nation reserves where there are no pharmacies or publicly available free Naloxone kits. You may not find these communities listed on the provincial government website ‘Where to get a free naloxone kit’ but deaths from overdoses are happening here at alarming rates.first nation grassy

While there is strong support for this new policy change, simply removing the legal barriers and improving the availability of this life saving intervention may not equal improved accessibility for some residents of Ontario.

LEGAL + AVAILABLE ≠ ACCESSIBLE

Major health disparities exist amongst remote First Nations communities living in Northern Ontario. These populations are socially marginalized and medically underserviced. Access to healthcare for these populations is limited as is the quality, equity and timeliness of the healthcare they do receive. This results in disproportionately high burdens of disease and poor health outcomes. First Nations youth have higher rates of suicide and an increase prevalence of risk taking behaviours which can all lead to higher rates of alcohol and drug abuse and ultimately death from overdose.

Attawapiskat

The government’s expansion of initiatives and services which take aim at combating the opioid epidemic in Canada need to target all Canadians and not just those living in urban centers. If the government is serious about broadening access to initiatives like free Naloxone it needs to couple that with initiatives to ensure these initiatives reach the most vulnerable and disadvantaged members of society like the remote First Nation reserves of Northern Ontario. There needs to be a global expansion of healthcare funding for Aboriginal populations that aims to reduce the health disparities that currently exist in these populations.  Otherwise available does not equal accessible.

 

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